Recent Community Posts

The Dreaded Flu Season

1/12/2023 (Permalink)

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Serious outcomes of a flu infection can result in hospitalization or death, according to the American Red Cross. Seasonal flu in the United States occurs in the fall and winter months. While influenza viruses circulate year round, most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, but activity can last as late as May. Flu viruses are spread by droplets made when people with the flu cough, sneeze, or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby or be inhaled into their lungs. Healthy habits to help prevent the flu include getting vaccinated, avoiding close contact with others, staying at home when you're sick, covering your mouth and nose, washing your hands, avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, and practicing other good health habits. Stay informed about public health recommendations related to the flu by visiting the CDC website.

Interior Holiday Punch List

12/20/2022 (Permalink)

  • Check the seasonal plants you have in your home, and make sure they’re not poisonous to children or pets.
  •  Keep your tree (really all decorations) at least three feet away from heat sources
  • Turn off all lights and decorations when you go to sleep or leave the house. 
  • Don’t post your travel or vacation plans on social media until after you return. 
  • Alert a neighbor you trust that you will be out of town and leave them with a spare key for emergencies (or to retrieve packages and put them safely inside your home).
  • If you’re leaving town, set your lights on a timer, alternating a few inside to give the appearance of occupancy. 
  • If you’ll be gone long, have the post office hold your mail for you. 
  • If you’ll be gone while the weather gets below freezing, it’s best to turn off your water at the meter as a precaution. 

Source: https://www.nsc.org/community-safety/safety-topics/seasonal-safety/winter-safety/holiday 

Winter Car Emergency Kit

12/13/2022 (Permalink)

When you hear the phrase “emergency kit,” do you think of a first aid kit? A collection of supplies nestled in a closet somewhere, just in case they are needed? What about an emergency kit for your vehicle? Do you have one? Do you know what to put in one, should you decide to make one?

The NSC (National Safety Council) recommends including: 

• Nonperishable, high-energy foods

• Drinking water

• Reflective vest in case you need to walk to get help

• Car cell phone charger

• Jumper cables

• Fire extinguisher

• Duct tape

• Rain poncho

• Compass

• Flashlight with extra batteries

• Cold weather items: snow brush, shovel, windshield washer fluid, warm clothing, cat litter for traction

• A properly inflated spare tire, wheel wrench, and tripod jack

• A Tool kit and/or multipurpose utility tool

• Reflective triangles and brightly colored cloth to make your vehicle more visible

• First aid kit with gauze, tape, bandages, antibiotic ointment, aspirin, a blanket, non-latex gloves, scissors, hydrocortisone, thermometer, tweezers, and instant cold compress

When assembling your emergency kit, though we’re specifically focusing on prepping for the holidays, do consider what you might need on a regular basis, and assess what you should add or remove, depending on your destination, weather conditions, or the duration of your trip. You should check your emergency kit at least every six months, and restock items that you use or that have expired. 

Source: https://www.nsc.org/community-safety/safety-topics/emergency-preparedness/emergency-supplies-for-car 

Weather Warnings on the go

11/28/2022 (Permalink)

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government-alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. There is no sign-up required. Alerts are sent automatically to WEA capable phones during a threatening weather emergency.
According to weather.gov, alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. The types of alerts the National Weather Service will send out are typically about tsunami warnings, tornado and flash flood warnings, hurricane, typhoon, storm surges and extreme wind warnings, as well as dust storms and snow squall warnings.
When you receive a WEA, follow any action advised by the emergency message, especially if it involves an immediate evacuation. Seek more details from your preferred television or radio station, NOAA Weather Radio, or another trusted source of information. 

Holiday Safety Travel Tips

11/9/2022 (Permalink)

With the holidays fast approaching, perhaps you are making plans to travel to visit family or friends. Before you hit the road to stuff your belly, take a little extra time to prepare your house for your absence. This will only increase your peace of mind while you’re away and help reduce the chances of unexpected problems. For example, emptying the fridge and pantry of foods that will perish while you are gone is a good practice; consider freezing items that could be saved for later. Throw your items away before your weekly trash pick-up, to avoid critters feasting on your scraps. To ensure that you are aware of any thawing of the freezer, place a cup of ice in there. When you return, if the ice is still separate, the food should be fi ne. If, however, the ice has melted, that indicates that the contents in your freezer thawed and re-froze, which means you should throw away what was in there. Set your thermostat for your absence. Consider turning off the water at the main line. If you do turn off the water, remember to run the faucets until they are dry, and flush all the toilets and turn off their incoming water at the base of the tank. If you will be gone awhile, it might be a good idea to turn off your hot water heater as well, or set it to vacation mode, to save energy. Make sure that all exterior windows and doors are locked, including the garage. If you have a hide-a-key, think about  moving it inside, or giving it to a trusted neighbor in case of an emergency. If you have a fi replace, close the flue to prevent animals and birds from coming inside from that route. Aside from ensuring that your home avoids accidental damage in your absence, you want it to appear that you are not gone. Set lights on a timer, ask your neighbors to check on your property, and do not post about being out of town on social media. By following these suggestions, you will be in a good position to enjoy your holiday season!

Preparedness for Pets

10/21/2022 (Permalink)

Pets are just as important as any family member to most people, so why would you not make them a part of your preparedness planning? There are several things you can do to make sure they stay safe as well during an emergency.
Pet Emergency Kit
Ready.gov/animals lists the below items as essential to building your Pet Emergency Kit.
Food. At least a three day supply in an airtight, waterproof container. Water. At least three days of water specifically for your pets. Medicines and medical recordsImportant documents. Registration information, adoption papers and vaccination documents. Talk to your veterinarian about microchipping and enrolling your pet in a recovery database. First aid kit. Cotton bandage rolls, bandage tape and scissors; antibiotic ointment; flea and tick prevention; latex gloves, isopropyl alcohol and saline solution. Including a pet first aid reference book is a good idea too. Collar or harness with ID tag, rabies tag and a leash. Crate or pet carrier. Have a sturdy, safe crate or carrier in case you need to evacuate. The carrier should be large enough for your pet to stand, turn around and lie down. Sanitation. Pet litter and litter box if appropriate, newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags and household chlorine bleach. A picture of you and your pet together. If you become separated, a picture of you and your pet together will help you document ownership and allow others to assist you. Add species, breed, age, sex, color and distinguishing characteristics. Familiar items. Familiar items, such as treats, toys and bedding can help reduce stress for your pet.
Evacuations
While practicing fire escape or evacuation plans, be sure to include pets. If an evacuation happens, don’t leave pets behind as they can be lost or injured.
Identification Microchipping pets is a great way to locate them. Most veterinary clinics and shelters have scanners that will read the microchip information to help find a pet’s owners. Be sure to take four-legged friends into consideration when planning for emergencies. Visit ready.gov/ animals for further tips and safety precautions to think about for you or your insured’s family pets, or your tenant's pets during a disaster.

National Day of Service and Remembrance

9/12/2022 (Permalink)

In honor and memory of those who died on September 11, 2001, as well as the survivors and First Responders, National Day of Service and Remembrance was established in 2009 as a day of reflection. Led by the Corporation for National and Community Service, this is a day to come together as Americans following the events of 9/11 to help neighbors in need and to honor veterans and First Responders in your community. On this day and everyday, SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas salutes those heroes who arrive in the greatest times of need and stand strong in the face of disaster. These heroes are the First Responders who keep our communities safe in trying times. Give back and make a difference in your community this year. To find a volunteer opportunity near you, or to register your National Day of Service and Remembrance event, visit https://nationalservice.gov/serve/september-11th-national-day-service-and-remembrance

A Salute to First Responders

4/21/2022 (Permalink)

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.'” This famous Mr. Rogers quote comes to mind when we celebrate first responders: those who arrive first on the scene of any disaster or emergency. In the event of a disaster or emergency, there are many different agencies and people in your community who are ready to respond. Whether it’s a house fire or a hurricane, we are thankful every day for these first responders.

Firefighters, EMTs, and Police

Local fire and police departments, as well as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), are often first on the scene of an emergency. In the U.S., there are more than 29,700 fire departments with 1,160,450 total firefighters, according to the National Fire Protection Association’s 2015 U.S. Fire Department Profile. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are almost 245,000 EMTs and paramedics in the U.S. In the U.S. there are about 18,000 federal, state, county, and local law enforcement agencies, employing more than 750,000 fulltime sworn officers, according to the Uniformed Crime Reporting Program collected by the FBI.
Military
When events such as natural disasters strike, different branches of the military are often a first line of response. The Army National Guard and Air National Guard, with over 342,000 soldiers, respond domestically when deployed by their state Governor, often during states of emergency from weather-related events. They can also be called upon during terrorist attacks or civil unrest, or called overseas by the President of the United States. Active duty soldiers can also be called upon for certain domestic events as well.
FEMA Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)
As a part of FEMA’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), these volunteers are trained to be prepared for any disasters that may affect your local area in an effort to support professional responders. CERT volunteers are trained in “basic disaster response skills such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations,” according to FEMA. With more than 2,700 CERT programs, over 600,000 individuals have been trained nationwide. Teams are managed locally, but supported nationally by FEMA.

SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas recognizes these and the countless other first responders in our communities for keeping our communities safe.

The Dreaded Flu Season

1/13/2022 (Permalink)

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Serious outcomes of a flu infection can result in hospitalization or death, according to the American Red Cross. Seasonal flu in the United States occurs in the fall and winter months. While influenza viruses circulate year round, most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, but activity can last as late as May. Flu viruses are spread by droplets made when people with the flu cough, sneeze, or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby or be inhaled into their lungs. Healthy habits to help prevent the flu include getting vaccinated, avoiding close contact with others, staying at home when you're sick, covering your mouth and nose, washing your hands, avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, and practicing other good health habits. Stay informed about public health recommendations related to the flu by visiting the CDC website.

Interior Holiday Punch List

12/21/2021 (Permalink)

  • Check the seasonal plants you have in your home, and make sure they’re not poisonous to children or pets.
  •  Keep your tree (really all decorations) at least three feet away from heat sources
  • Turn off all lights and decorations when you go to sleep or leave the house. 
  • Don’t post your travel or vacation plans on social media until after you return. 
  • Alert a neighbor you trust that you will be out of town and leave them with a spare key for emergencies (or to retrieve packages and put them safely inside your home).
  • If you’re leaving town, set your lights on a timer, alternating a few inside to give the appearance of occupancy. 
  • If you’ll be gone long, have the post office hold your mail for you. 
  • If you’ll be gone while the weather gets below freezing, it’s best to turn off your water at the meter as a precaution. 

Source: https://www.nsc.org/community-safety/safety-topics/seasonal-safety/winter-safety/holiday 

Winter Car Emergency Kit

12/16/2021 (Permalink)

When you hear the phrase “emergency kit,” do you think of a first aid kit? A collection of supplies nestled in a closet somewhere, just in case they are needed? What about an emergency kit for your vehicle? Do you have one? Do you know what to put in one, should you decide to make one?

The NSC (National Safety Council) recommends including: 

• Nonperishable, high-energy foods

• Drinking water

• Reflective vest in case you need to walk to get help

• Car cell phone charger

• Jumper cables

• Fire extinguisher

• Duct tape

• Rain poncho

• Compass

• Flashlight with extra batteries

• Cold weather items: snow brush, shovel, windshield washer fluid, warm clothing, cat litter for traction

• A properly inflated spare tire, wheel wrench, and tripod jack

• A Tool kit and/or multipurpose utility tool

• Reflective triangles and brightly colored cloth to make your vehicle more visible

• First aid kit with gauze, tape, bandages, antibiotic ointment, aspirin, a blanket, non-latex gloves, scissors, hydrocortisone, thermometer, tweezers, and instant cold compress

When assembling your emergency kit, though we’re specifically focusing on prepping for the holidays, do consider what you might need on a regular basis, and assess what you should add or remove, depending on your destination, weather conditions, or the duration of your trip. You should check your emergency kit at least every six months, and restock items that you use or that have expired. 

Source: https://www.nsc.org/community-safety/safety-topics/emergency-preparedness/emergency-supplies-for-car 

Weather Warnings on the go CommunityApproved

11/22/2021 (Permalink)

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government-alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. There is no sign-up required. Alerts are sent automatically to WEA capable phones during a threatening weather emergency.
According to weather.gov, alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. The types of alerts the National Weather Service will send out are typically about tsunami warnings, tornado and flash flood warnings, hurricane, typhoon, storm surges and extreme wind warnings, as well as dust storms and snow squall warnings.
When you receive a WEA, follow any action advised by the emergency message, especially if it involves an immediate evacuation. Seek more details from your preferred television or radio station, NOAA Weather Radio, or another trusted source of information. 

National Day of Service and Remembrance

9/11/2021 (Permalink)

In honor and memory of those who died on September 11, 2001, as well as the survivors and First Responders, National Day of Service and Remembrance was established in 2009 as a day of reflection. Led by the Corporation for National and Community Service, this is a day to come together as Americans following the events of 9/11 to help neighbors in need and to honor veterans and First Responders in your community. On this day and everyday, SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas salutes those heroes who arrive in the greatest times of need and stand strong in the face of disaster. These heroes are the First Responders who keep our communities safe in trying times. Give back and make a difference in your community this year. To find a volunteer opportunity near you, or to register your National Day of Service and Remembrance event, visit https://nationalservice.gov/serve/september-11th-national-day-service-and-remembrance

Extreme Heat Safety Tips

5/14/2021 (Permalink)

Did You Know? It is NEVER safe to leave a baby, toddler, disabled person, or pet locked in a car. On average, 37 children die from heat related deaths from being trapped inside vehicles.

  • Install window air conditioners snugly; insulate if necessary.
  • Check air-conditioning ducts for proper insulation.
  • Install temporary window reflectors (for use between windows and drapes), such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside.
  • Weather-strip doors and sills to keep cool air in.
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings, or louvers. (Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent.) Keep storm windows up all year.

Source: ready.gov

A Salute to First Responders

4/19/2021 (Permalink)

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.'” This famous Mr. Rogers quote comes to mind when we celebrate first responders: those who arrive first on the scene of any disaster or emergency. In the event of a disaster or emergency, there are many different agencies and people in your community who are ready to respond. Whether it’s a house fire or a hurricane, we are thankful every day for these first responders.

Firefighters, EMTs, and Police

Local fire and police departments, as well as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), are often first on the scene of an emergency. In the U.S., there are more than 29,700 fire departments with 1,160,450 total firefighters, according to the National Fire Protection Association’s 2015 U.S. Fire Department Profile. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are almost 245,000 EMTs and paramedics in the U.S. In the U.S. there are about 18,000 federal, state, county, and local law enforcement agencies, employing more than 750,000 fulltime sworn officers, according to the Uniformed Crime Reporting Program collected by the FBI.
Military
When events such as natural disasters strike, different branches of the military are often a first line of response. The Army National Guard and Air National Guard, with over 342,000 soldiers, respond domestically when deployed by their state Governor, often during states of emergency from weather-related events. They can also be called upon during terrorist attacks or civil unrest, or called overseas by the President of the United States. Active duty soldiers can also be called upon for certain domestic events as well.
FEMA Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)
As a part of FEMA’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), these volunteers are trained to be prepared for any disasters that may affect your local area in an effort to support professional responders. CERT volunteers are trained in “basic disaster response skills such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations,” according to FEMA. With more than 2,700 CERT programs, over 600,000 individuals have been trained nationwide. Teams are managed locally, but supported nationally by FEMA.

SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas recognizes these and the countless other first responders in our communities for keeping our communities safe.

The Dreaded Flu Season

1/8/2021 (Permalink)

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Serious outcomes of a flu infection can result in hospitalization or death, according to the American Red Cross. Seasonal flu in the United States occurs in the fall and winter months. While influenza viruses circulate year round, most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, but activity can last as late as May. Flu viruses are spread by droplets made when people with the flu cough, sneeze, or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby or be inhaled into their lungs. Healthy habits to help prevent the flu include getting vaccinated, avoiding close contact with others, staying at home when you're sick, covering your mouth and nose, washing your hands, avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, and practicing other good health habits. Stay informed about public health recommendations related to the flu by visiting the CDC website.

Dangers of Extreme Cold

12/21/2020 (Permalink)

While your home may be damaged due to winter weather and extreme cold, your personal health is also at risk. Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as heart attacks from overexertion, according to Ready.gov. That is why it’s important to be aware of the effect extremely cold temperatures can have on you.

Frostbite is caused when your skin is exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Physical symptoms include white or grayish-yellow skin, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, and numbness. Hypothermia is when your body temperature falls to an abnormally low temperature caused from long exposure to cold weather. Signs of hypothermia include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, and drowsiness. If someone's body temperature is below 95°F, seek medical attention immediately. To avoid these conditions, stay indoors, if possible. If not, dress in layers to stay warm and keep dry. 

National Influenza Vaccination Week

12/18/2020 (Permalink)

Starting in 2005, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) established the National Influenza Vaccination Week to highlight the importance of continuing flu vaccination throughout the holiday season and beyond.
During the 2017-2018 flu season, the CDC estimates the flu caused 49 million flu-related illnesses (more than the combined populations of Texas and Florida), 960,000 flu hospitalizations (more than the number of staffed hospital beds in the United States), and 79,000 deaths (more than the average number of people who attend the Super Bowl each year.) If you’ve already gotten the flu this season, you should still get vaccinated to protect yourself against other strands of the flu. People with a high risk of complications from the flu include young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions, and people over the age of 65. Get a flu shot today to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Weather Warnings on the go

11/30/2020 (Permalink)

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government-alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. There is no sign-up required. Alerts are sent automatically to WEA capable phones during a threatening weather emergency.
According to weather.gov, alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. The types of alerts the National Weather Service will send out are typically about tsunami warnings, tornado and flash flood warnings, hurricane, typhoon, storm surges and extreme wind warnings, as well as dust storms and snow squall warnings.
When you receive a WEA, follow any action advised by the emergency message, especially if it involves an immediate evacuation. Seek more details from your preferred television or radio station, NOAA Weather Radio, or another trusted source of information. 

National Day of Service and Remembrance

9/11/2020 (Permalink)

In honor and memory of those who died on September 11, 2001, as well as the survivors and First Responders, National Day of Service and Remembrance was established in 2009 as a day of reflection. Led by the Corporation for National and Community Service, this is a day to come together as Americans following the events of 9/11 to help neighbors in need and to honor veterans and First Responders in your community. On this day and everyday, SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas salutes those heroes who arrive in the greatest times of need and stand strong in the face of disaster. These heroes are the First Responders who keep our communities safe in trying times. Give back and make a difference in your community this year. To find a volunteer opportunity near you, or to register your National Day of Service and Remembrance event, visit https://nationalservice.gov/serve/september-11th-national-day-service-and-remembrance

Dangers of Extreme Cold

1/2/2020 (Permalink)

While your home may be damaged due to winter weather and extreme cold, your personal health is also at risk. Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as heart attacks from overexertion, according to Ready.gov. That is why it’s important to be aware of the effect extremely cold temperatures can have on you.

Frostbite is caused when your skin is exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Physical symptoms include white or grayish-yellow skin, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, and numbness. Hypothermia is when your body temperature falls to an abnormally low temperature caused from long exposure to cold weather. Signs of hypothermia include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, and drowsiness. If someone's body temperature is below 95°F, seek medical attention immediately. To avoid these conditions, stay indoors, if possible. If not, dress in layers to stay warm and keep dry. 

Weather Warnings on the go

12/9/2019 (Permalink)

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government-alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. There is no sign-up required. Alerts are sent automatically to WEA capable phones during a threatening weather emergency.
According to weather.gov, alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. The types of alerts the National Weather Service will send out are typically about tsunami warnings, tornado and flash flood warnings, hurricane, typhoon, storm surges and extreme wind warnings, as well as dust storms and snow squall warnings.
When you receive a WEA, follow any action advised by the emergency message, especially if it involves an immediate evacuation. Seek more details from your preferred television or radio station, NOAA Weather Radio, or another trusted source of information. 

National Influenza Vaccination Week

12/3/2019 (Permalink)

Starting in 2005, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) established the National Influenza Vaccination Week to highlight the importance of continuing flu vaccination throughout the holiday season and beyond.
During the 2017-2018 flu season, the CDC estimates the flu caused 49 million flu-related illnesses (more than the combined populations of Texas and Florida), 960,000 flu hospitalizations (more than the number of staffed hospital beds in the United States), and 79,000 deaths (more than the average number of people who attend the Super Bowl each year.) If you’ve already gotten the flu this season, you should still get vaccinated to protect yourself against other strands of the flu. People with a high risk of complications from the flu include young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions, and people over the age of 65. Get a flu shot today to protect yourself and your loved ones.

National Day of Service and Remembrance

9/11/2019 (Permalink)

In honor and memory of those who died on September 11, 2001, as well as the survivors and First Responders, National Day of Service and Remembrance was established in 2009 as a day of reflection. Led by the Corporation for National and Community Service, this is a day to come together as Americans following the events of 9/11 to help neighbors in need and to honor veterans and First Responders in your community. On this day and everyday, SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas salutes those heroes who arrive in the greatest times of need and stand strong in the face of disaster. These heroes are the First Responders who keep our communities safe in trying times. Give back and make a difference in your community this year. To find a volunteer opportunity near you, or to register your National Day of Service and Remembrance event, visit https://nationalservice.gov/serve/september-11th-national-day-service-and-remembrance

Summer Ready

7/7/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas is “Ready for whatever happens.” You can be too this summer. 

Each year, families and friends across the country enjoy the summer months with barbecues, camping trips,or by cooling off in a pool or lake. To enjoy these occasions, it is important to keep safety top of mind to ensure you have fun in the sun. 

According to a recent study by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, nearly 11,900 Americans were injured by fireworks in 2015,with the majority happening in the month surrounding the Fourth of July. Another 8,700 are injured by charcoal/wood-burning and propane grill fires.A grill should always be supervised when in use. Keep children and pets a safe distance from the grilling area to prevent accidental burns or tipping of the grill. 

Grills also cause an average of 8,900 home structure or outdoor fires.“These fires caused an annual average of 50 civilian injuries and $2 million in direct property damage,” according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). 

If you enjoy lounging by the pool or going for a boat ride to cool off from the summer sun, make sure you exercise caution, especially when children are present. Only swim in approved areas and supervise children at all times when near the water. 

The summer season should be a time to make memories and enjoy the great outdoors. Don’t become a statistic. Take precautions to prevent these events from putting a damper on your summer months!